And the tallest chimney is?

Tulketh MillSeems, initially, an easy question to answer: which is the tallest surviving 19C industrial chimney in the country? OK, so which country, and mills or chemical works, and brick/stone, and circular/octagonal/square cross-section; so many combinations. We could have the tallest brick octagonal mill chimney in England – so that’s the one at Shaddon Mill (1836) in Carlisle, now 270ft but originally 305ft. At first this was not the tallest in England when built, as is often quoted, although it did become such (if you see what I mean) when the Adams soap works chimney (1836) in Smethwick was truncated. As for the ultimate tallest in England, that’s the chimney at India Mills (1867) in Darwen, a polychromatic brick square cross-section monster of 289ft (11ft reduced from its original height). This just beats, by 6ft2in, the sublime Cox’s Stack (1865) at the Camperdown Works in Dundee, which remains just as it was built. Curious that the real mega-chimneys at Glasgow chemical plants, Tennant’s Stalk (1842, 435ft6in) at St Rollox and Townsend’s at Port Dundas (1859, 454ft), both brick with circular cross-section, have gone but the more decorative polychromatic stacks remain. But I’m still delving into the world of chimneys, so don’t take all this as the last word! The pic is of Tulketh Mill (1905) in Preston, with its brick chimney (231ft, now reduced to 180ft) used to advertise a firm of steeplejacks. By the way, if you are wondering about the lack of metric measurement, they were built in feet, so they stay that way for the moment. Hope to see the Darwen stack for myself soonish. Happy New Year everyone.

One response to “And the tallest chimney is?

  1. Cameron’s Brewery at Hartlepool has a round brick Victorian chimney at around 185′ in height. There is an octagonal one at the Ryhope pumping station about thirty miles north and that must be around 200′.

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