Shopping 1959 style

Recently checked through a few old copies of Architectural Review to see what they threw up in terms of co-op related adverts and so on. This rather lovely specimen from October 1959 encapsulates the sheer awesomeness of the new self-service stores (or perhaps it was just singles night….). We forget how totally different shopping was pre-supermarkets, and it must have taken shop managements some time to adjust to the ‘browsing’ aspect of the new ways. The illustration shows very well the things shop designers were doing in the late 1950s – brightness, good lighting, colourful floors and walls – and the colour aside, it’s not too different from today’s (blander) supermarkets. The advert, by the way, was for the flooring system, in use at one of the London Co-operative Society’s stores. Anyway, the dog looks pretty happy about it all!

Old English style in Lewes

As ever, the sun shone in Lewes, and the former Co-op store – now an auctioneer’s, and remarkably unchanged aside from the fascia – was easy to photograph from a handy spiral staircase running up a tall warehouse-cum-workshop across the road. Plans for the building were produced in 1905 by the architects Denman & Matthews of Brighton, best known for their public houses, and the new store opened in October 1906; 70 people celebrated with luncheon in the Town Hall. Co-operative News commented that ‘something of the old English style of the sixteenth century [had] been reproduced’ by the architects (the list description settles for ‘Arts and Crafts’), and the striking tower was paid for by the local co-operative society’s president. Inside the shop, customers could buy groceries on the ground floor or ascend to the first floor for clothing and hardwares. A photo of the opening day shows a street crammed with people, many women in wide-brimmed hats and boys in caps, all keen to see inside the new store. A splendid survivor indeed.