To Oakengates

To Oakengates – just beyond Telford in Shropshire – to see the old co-op, where the pretty mosaic panel was rediscovered during recent renovations. For anyone venturing further and into the delightful Ironbridge Gorge, the present co-op is housed in a splendid old red brick warehouse beside the Severn, great use for the building.

Hands of Friendship in York

The scaffolding has finally come off the former Co-op central premises in York, after what seems like years. And – once the rain had stopped – the building looked very smart, even down to the somewhat understated display of co-op symbolism. Once you get your eye in, it is easy to spot various hands of friendship and beehives, all high up on what I think must be a sandstone facade. Shortly off to the Ironbridge Gorge Museum Trust Library to delve into the Hathern Terracotta Company archives, to get more details on the many co-op facades the firm was responsible for between the wars.

A Paragon at Beamish

Popped along to Beamish Open Air Museum last week to take a look at the old co-op building, transferred from nearby (fairly) Annfield Plain. Gives you a great feeling of how turn-of-the-century shopping worked, with each shop in its separate section, unlike the generally later department stores. The best part was the drapery, tremendously gloomy and atmospheric – how did anyone see what proper colour things were? – and best of all with an original working cash transfer machine by the Lamson Paragon Company, which came from another co-op. It uses a wooden cash ball and requires the assistant to haul it up on to the railings above using pulleys; it then travels along to the cash office via the rails. The cashier then takes the member number details, sorts out the change, and returns the ball. Cunningly, the wooden balls are different sizes, so each gets back to the correct shop assistant. Brilliant! If you have about ten minutes to wait, which I suppose everyone did then. The system was later replaced with vacuum tubes in most shops. Something of a contrast to ‘unexpected item in the bagging area’……

Not quite a secret garden

But a secret doorway anyway – in this brilliantly colourful artwork round the back of Kings Cross, by the amazing gasholders. It’s called 700 Reflectors, and when you get up close, that’s exactly what it turns out to be (I didn’t count them….). Seen on my way from Kent to Hull taking pics of more co-ops.

Trains, boats and trucks

Here in glorious sunny Lewisham the frontage of the recently revamped 1930s Royal Arsenal Co-operative Society building Tower House is looking spiffing. Delightful ceramic details abound, with the little trucks even bearing RACS lettering. The ground floor is not yet complete – the building is going to be apartments – but the upper floors of the exterior show the RACS at its architectural best. Even the little ventilators come in the form of RACS letters.

Endless sunshine in Lancashire

Spent most of last week taking photos of assorted old co-op buildings west of the Pennines, and enjoying incredibly sunny days; wonderful for photography. Saw some really splendid old co-ops, from Carlisle through Lancaster and Preston, Blackburn and Burnley, Hayfield and New Mills, and lots more. On the way back stopped in Todmorden, where many thanks to the lovely people at the Old Co-op Café, who let me in to take pics even though they were busy with rearranging their beautiful interior. Highly recommended! My favourite photo of the whole trip is this one from east Manchester, the Droylsden Co-op’s tenth branch, built in 1908. A passer-by stopped to tell me his auntie used to live in the building (unlisted), which seemingly is currently being renovated; let’s hope so.

Wheatsheaf or lotus?

I’ve seen quite a few architectural representations of wheatsheaves – one of several symbols of co-operation – lately, mostly on Victorian and Edwardian co-op stores. So when I came across this version, on a 1935 co-op emporium in Long Eaton, Derbyshire (now functioning as a carpet warehouse, and still with a 1963 co-op open staircase inside), I thought it was simply an art deco wheatsheaf. But now I see similar items on other co-op stores referred to as a lotus, an iconic symbol used in art deco architecture. Seems to me it could be either; maybe the architect was keeping up with the times and art deco-ing the wheatsheaf, or perhaps indeed it is a lotus, and thus nothing to do with the co-op movement’s symbolism. Other examples welcome! And don’t forget to follow me on Twitter!