The publication process begins!

The co-op architecture book – working title ‘England’s Co-operative Movement: An Architectural History’ – has survived its peer review (thanks to the reader for the helpful comments) and is now starting to wend its way through the Liverpool University Press production process. This is not a quick business, and things happen at about the speed of this horse-powered milk float from the Newport Pagnell Co-operative Society. Current estimate of publication date is late autumn next year, so one for the 2020 Christmas list!

Co-op architecture book complete!

It’s taken a while, but the co-op architecture book is now complete and with the publisher, Liverpool University Press, who will publish it under the Historic England imprint sometime in 2020 hopefully. The whole project has lasted about five fascinating years, travelling around looking at co-op buildings and delving into archives. Thanks to all the staff at the many libraries and archives visited, especially the National Co-operative Archive in Manchester, with whom I shared the joys of working while the surrounding co-op estate was being renovated! Never a day without scaffolding….. These two pics, art deco Tamworth and brutalist Aberdeen, show just how varied co-op architecture can be. Can’t wait to see the proofs.

Co-op architecture book progress report

Just getting my head up from writing for a quick progress report – the book is now two-thirds written, so not too long to go. Then I have to write the captions! Enjoyed a trip to sunny Manchester to see the Co-op Quarter looking good, now refurbishment heading towards completion. What makes the area stand out is not simply the height of the buildings, there are many others in the city of a similar or greater height, but their density on the ground; the roads between are very narrow.

CWS cigarette cards

This is one of a set of 28 cigarette cards issued by the CWS around 1914-16 on the theme of CWS buildings and works. The quality of the images is obviously not great, but the fact that they are in colour is really useful architecturally. The series didn’t have a proper title, and the individual cards weren’t numbered, but I gather a collectors’ handbook has given them numbers. I’ve seen 25 out of the 28 as follows: 1 Tralee, 2 Crumpsall, 3 Leicester, 4 Bristol, 5 Leeds, 6 Dudley, 8 Manchester HQ, 9 Luton, 10 Desborough, 12 Avonmouth, 13 Dunston (flour mill), 14 Silvertown (flour mill), 15 Manchester (Sun Mill), 16 Huthwaite, 18 Middleton, 20 Newcastle, 22 Longsight, 23 Dunston (soap works), 24 Irlam, 25 Silvertown (soap works), 26 London (tea), 27 Manchester (tobacco), 28 Bury. I also know that there are cards for Pelaw (see pic) and Keighley, but I don’t know their numbers. So if anyone knows what numbers 7, 11, 17, 19 and 21 are, it would be great to hear from you!

Not as pretty as a postcard

This is Edmonton Green in north London, the shop in question originally being a fine store built for the local co-operative society in 1903. If you look only at first floor level upward, it remains almost exactly the same as it was on several colourful postcards issued at the time to mark its opening. It really must have been quite THE place to shop back then. The architect was Tom Yates of the CWS London branch Architects’ Department. Now, of course, all the old shopfronts have disappeared, but I suppose we should be thankful that the whole building has not gone the way of Edmonton’s town hall, which stood close by on Fore Street. All that remains is a clock, looking rather sorry for itself opposite a huge retail park!

Carnival time

Just a quick update on the progress of the co-operative architecture book. Having been buried in the various archives for about two years, I’ve now accumulated more than enough material for the book – but no doubt I shall be rushing back to Manchester, London or wherever when I come across some missing link. So organising starts today, and writing shortly after for completion spring next year – hopefully! The weather has been kind lately so most of the photography is done. In fact the weather has been rather like June 1921 when this carnival-related shot was taken, probably in Manchester. It shows a group, mostly children, carrying and wearing all sorts of adverts for CWS own-brand products. They must have been an entry in one of the carnival competitions. Talk about brand loyalty!