A Paragon at Beamish

Popped along to Beamish Open Air Museum last week to take a look at the old co-op building, transferred from nearby (fairly) Annfield Plain. Gives you a great feeling of how turn-of-the-century shopping worked, with each shop in its separate section, unlike the generally later department stores. The best part was the drapery, tremendously gloomy and atmospheric – how did anyone see what proper colour things were? – and best of all with an original working cash transfer machine by the Lamson Paragon Company, which came from another co-op. It uses a wooden cash ball and requires the assistant to haul it up on to the railings above using pulleys; it then travels along to the cash office via the rails. The cashier then takes the member number details, sorts out the change, and returns the ball. Cunningly, the wooden balls are different sizes, so each gets back to the correct shop assistant. Brilliant! If you have about ten minutes to wait, which I suppose everyone did then. The system was later replaced with vacuum tubes in most shops. Something of a contrast to ‘unexpected item in the bagging area’……

Trains, boats and trucks

Here in glorious sunny Lewisham the frontage of the recently revamped 1930s Royal Arsenal Co-operative Society building Tower House is looking spiffing. Delightful ceramic details abound, with the little trucks even bearing RACS lettering. The ground floor is not yet complete – the building is going to be apartments – but the upper floors of the exterior show the RACS at its architectural best. Even the little ventilators come in the form of RACS letters.

Endless sunshine in Lancashire

Spent most of last week taking photos of assorted old co-op buildings west of the Pennines, and enjoying incredibly sunny days; wonderful for photography. Saw some really splendid old co-ops, from Carlisle through Lancaster and Preston, Blackburn and Burnley, Hayfield and New Mills, and lots more. On the way back stopped in Todmorden, where many thanks to the lovely people at the Old Co-op Café, who let me in to take pics even though they were busy with rearranging their beautiful interior. Highly recommended! My favourite photo of the whole trip is this one from east Manchester, the Droylsden Co-op’s tenth branch, built in 1908. A passer-by stopped to tell me his auntie used to live in the building (unlisted), which seemingly is currently being renovated; let’s hope so.

Wheatsheaf or lotus?

I’ve seen quite a few architectural representations of wheatsheaves – one of several symbols of co-operation – lately, mostly on Victorian and Edwardian co-op stores. So when I came across this version, on a 1935 co-op emporium in Long Eaton, Derbyshire (now functioning as a carpet warehouse, and still with a 1963 co-op open staircase inside), I thought it was simply an art deco wheatsheaf. But now I see similar items on other co-op stores referred to as a lotus, an iconic symbol used in art deco architecture. Seems to me it could be either; maybe the architect was keeping up with the times and art deco-ing the wheatsheaf, or perhaps indeed it is a lotus, and thus nothing to do with the co-op movement’s symbolism. Other examples welcome! And don’t forget to follow me on Twitter!

Shopping 1959 style

Recently checked through a few old copies of Architectural Review to see what they threw up in terms of co-op related adverts and so on. This rather lovely specimen from October 1959 encapsulates the sheer awesomeness of the new self-service stores (or perhaps it was just singles night….). We forget how totally different shopping was pre-supermarkets, and it must have taken shop managements some time to adjust to the ‘browsing’ aspect of the new ways. The illustration shows very well the things shop designers were doing in the late 1950s – brightness, good lighting, colourful floors and walls – and the colour aside, it’s not too different from today’s (blander) supermarkets. The advert, by the way, was for the flooring system, in use at one of the London Co-operative Society’s stores. Anyway, the dog looks pretty happy about it all!

Old English style in Lewes

As ever, the sun shone in Lewes, and the former Co-op store – now an auctioneer’s, and remarkably unchanged aside from the fascia – was easy to photograph from a handy spiral staircase running up a tall warehouse-cum-workshop across the road. Plans for the building were produced in 1905 by the architects Denman & Matthews of Brighton, best known for their public houses, and the new store opened in October 1906; 70 people celebrated with luncheon in the Town Hall. Co-operative News commented that ‘something of the old English style of the sixteenth century [had] been reproduced’ by the architects (the list description settles for ‘Arts and Crafts’), and the striking tower was paid for by the local co-operative society’s president. Inside the shop, customers could buy groceries on the ground floor or ascend to the first floor for clothing and hardwares. A photo of the opening day shows a street crammed with people, many women in wide-brimmed hats and boys in caps, all keen to see inside the new store. A splendid survivor indeed.

Bow Road beehive

bow-road-beehiveTo London again this week for the British Library and yet more issues of Co-operative News, an invaluable source both for shop openings and general discussions – about advertising for instance – in the co-op movement. For a bit of light relief I went along to the Bow Road in Poplar, to photograph a 1919 Stratford Co-operative and Industrial Society store; it still functions as a supermarket, although not a co-op. It has a rather splendid beehive on its pediment, so well detailed that the individual bees and the hive’s structure are clearly visible. It’s near the Bow Church DLR station (and not far from Bow Road tube). If you happen to visit, don’t miss the former Poplar Town Hall (1937-8) just across the road, a smashing modernist building with sculptures in socialist realist style of various building labourers, and also mosaics above the councillors’ entrance. But you must cross the road to see the best bit, as there is a lovely mosaic design of the Thames and docklands beneath the entrance canopy, presumably to inspire the members as they looked up when entering the building!