A Scottish wheatsheaf

wheatsheaf-stonehavenIn Scotland last weekend to take various co-op photos (although really Scotland won’t feature a great deal in the co-op architecture book) as well as looking round the Verdant Works in Dundee. So here is doubtless one of very many wheatsheaves which I expect to see over the next few years, this one indicating the lovely art deco former co-op bakery at Stonehaven, near Aberdeen. Not sure if this is ceramic tile or enamel, probably the former. Similar signs show a cow or bull’s head, a basket of grocery and a pestle and mortar. The little row of shops connects with the even more wonderfully art deco Carron Restaurant to the rear, originally opened by the local co-op in 1937 and now functioning again (privately) after restoration. The second photo relates to my last book on industrial architecture, and shows the huge Cox’s Stack at Dundee’s Camperdown Works (jute of course) seen from above at the Law, a volcanic plug which looks down over the city. Quite a treat to see the chimney from above after staring up at it when trying to fit it into a photo from ground level. Liverpool next for more photos.

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Industrial architecture book published!

IndustArch cover smallUpdate: the book is published! Pleased to say I now have an advance copy of Victorian and Edwardian British Industrial Architecture, published by the Crowood Press in June 2016. I hope you’ll agree the cover looks good, even at low resolution! The front cover shows Paine’s Mill in Thetford, what remains of a former flour mill, a lovely gothic monument now serving as housing. Now available from the Crowood Press website, and soon elsewhere.

 

 

 

IndustArch back cover small

Southern infrastructure

Newhaven incinerator Shoreham Cement WorksJust completed walking the South Downs Way, and aside from the stupendous rural and seaside views, there were some really juicy bits of infrastructure. Probably the newest was the highly controversial incinerator at Newhaven (far left). Not having seen this before, it looked like a rather handsome winter garden, shining in the sunshine albeit sprouting a huge chimney. Probably looks a lot better from the Downs than it does on the ground, although I think it adds to the view, doesn’t detract. Same goes for the stadium at Falmer, which is a real eyeful from Ditchling Beacon and then slowly disappears as one walks east. In reality it is pretty large and looms above people arriving at the station. Near left is Shoreham Cement Works, actually nearer Upper Beeding. There’s been a quarry on the site since the mid-19th century, and production at the plant stopped in 1991. Since then several attempts at redevelopment have been postulated, usually involving housing, though one of the latest is an eco-park with homes for hobbits….. Back down south for the Victorian Society’s Study Day ‘Roll Out the Barrel’ on Saturday 7 May, see http://www.victoriansociety.org.uk/events/roll-out-the-barrel-beer-brewing-and-buildings-study-day/

Line shafting heaven in Bradford

DSC00754Made my first visit to Bradford Industrial Museum recently, and what an excellent place it is, packed full of working (check before you go, as they say) textile and other machinery. The line shafting on the ground floor of the mill is the best display I’ve seen, while the assorted weaving and spinning machines upstairs are brilliant, really make the process come to life. Indeed, one of the machines is so complex, bits of metal ‘arms’ waving in all directions, that it almost seems alive. It is a huge place, with lots more to see, including some good enamelled metal adverts. It was originally Moorside Mills – congratulations to Bradford Council for keeping it open and retaining the free admission policy. Well worth a visit.

 

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Another Portuguese puzzle

Silves1These photos are snaps of Silves, a city with a rather splendid castle, a little way north of Faro. Also a rare place in Portugal where I found craft beer being brewed (the bar was right next to the castle). The first photo is a view of the castle from the hotel, with (at the bottom) a roofless factory. The second photo shows the factory, with some excellent line shafting mechanisms. But what did the factory make or process? What on earth are the three large metal containers-on-legs? Looked at it for ages, but I have no idea. And on a completely different matter, booking is now open for the Victorian Society study day on beer and brewing, on 7 May in London, where I’m talking about brewers’ architect William Bradford.

 

Silves2

Concrete in Portugal

Santa CatarinaJust back from cycling in Portugal, coast-to-coast (and a bit inland) across the very bottom of the country. Too busy pedalling to photograph a great deal, but the Cooperativa Agricola at Santa Catarina da Fonte do Bispo (a bit north of Faro) was definitely worth a shot. A fine, if now apparently disused, piece of modernist industrial architecture. Back home we would doubtless know all about it, probably someone would have written a thesis on its architect, but I can find almost nothing about it on the web aside from 3 or 4 photos with no text. It makes one wonder about all the other agricultural co-op buildings in Portugal; the older ones certainly do appear in tourist and history books and websites. It was a similar story with what appears to be an art deco market building in Ayamonte (in Spain, across the river from the most easterly bit of Portugal). This is still in Ayamonte2commercial and office use, and painted in all sorts of attractive colours, but I’ve failed to find any reference whatsoever to it on the web, or even a photo. Likelihood is that I have been looking under the wrong name, but still a bit strange.

A big year for public art

wet boxing dayHappy New Year to all! Must be better than this wet Boxing Day evening in Newcastle upon Tyne. Lots to look forward to, starting with Historic England’s Out There postwar public art exhibition at London’s Somerset House, opening 3rd February 2016. With that in mind, I collected lots of my public art photos together and put them in an album, link online at There’s a lot of it about. No time to add captions – the industrial architecture book proofs have arrived – so really this is a public art quiz book, name the artworks! (It’s free to look at so no need to buy it…..)